Healthy Facts and Advices

Fast Facts On Potatoes

Fast Facts On Potatoes

Throughout America, potatoes are the most popular vegetable, even being ahead of other well known vegetables such as lettuce and onions. You can cook potatoes in a variety of ways, and they are included in one out of three meals eaten by almost all Americans. When they are prepared in a healthy way, a potato can be an excellent source of energy and also pack a nutritional punch.

Like oranges, potatoes are very high in vitamin C. The fact is, one medium potato contains 45% of the vitamin C that's recommended for good health. Potatoes are also high in fiber and carbohydrates and contain more potassium than a banana.

A potato is naturally low in calories and contains no fat, sodium, or cholesterol. The skins of the potatoes provide a helpful dose of fiber, iron, potassium, calcium, zinc, phosphorus, and several B vitamins.

You can prepare potatoes by boiling them, steaming them, or even roasting them. If at all possible, you should avoid putting potatoes in the refrigerator or freezing them, as cold will turn the potato starch to sugar and cause them to turn dark when they are cooked.

When you store potatoes, keep them in a cool, dark place. Too much light will cause them to turn green. You can store them in the basement if you have one, as the basement is the best place to keep potatoes.

From mashed potatoes to baked potatoes, a potato is something we all know and love. They serve many different tasty foods, and they provide our bodies with plenty of healthful benefits. We all eat potatoes, some of us even grow our own. Whether you grow your on or buy them, the potato is the one vegetable that makes everything just a little bit better.

Healthy Fat Intake

Healthy Fat Intake

This information is aimed at helping you to reduce your fat intake. The average individual eats too much fat, a factor that's linked to a variety of health problems, including cancer. Diets that are high in fat are associated with breast and colon cancer, with some studies linking high fat to prostate cancer as well.

A majority of people can bring their fat intakes down to a healthy range by making a few adjustments in the way they shop, cook, and prepare the foods they eat.

Now days, it's getting easier and easier to control the amount of fat you consume. The fat content of foods are now available through the nutrition label and through brochures distributed by food companies and even fast food restaurants.

You can use this information on nutrition to choose lower fat foods by comparing products and food brands. Once you have a rough idea of what a healthy intake of fat is, you'll know what you can and what you can't have.

From day to day, the amount of fat you eat will vary. Some meals and some days will be higher in fat than others. Even high fat meals can be kept in line with healthy eating as long as you balance those days accordingly. The average fat intake over the course of weeks and months is important, not the fat intake of every meal and food you consume.

Younger adults and high active adults who have higher calorie needs can probably eat a little more fat. Older adults and those that aren't very active should aim for a lower fat intake. This way, you can control your fat intake and avoid the many problems that fat is associated with.